Coding Club at the Frankfurt International School

Please order memberships separately. You can only subscribe to one membership per order.

Level Grade 3 and 4. No previous experience necessary.
Number of participants 8 to 12 per tutor.
Schedule During school time once a week every Monday or every Tuesday continuously. Excluding public holidays.
Time and duration 90 minutes from 2.30 – 4 pm

Impressions from the classroom:

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To register your child for the Junior Coding Club at Ernst-Reuter Schule, first select the school term (1) and the day of the week for the class (2). If you have already registered one child and now want to register a sibling, you can select a second or third child (optional).

After you have selected the school term and weekday, a form for your child’s registration data will appear below.

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Course Description

Coding Club for half a year for 90 minutes in the afternoon, ideally between 2.30 p.m. and 4 p.m. For third and fourth grade children. The afternoon coding club is offered as a continuous course for up to 12 learners, with more intensive supervision and teamwork. The weekly course is aimed in particular at children who want to delve deeper into the Digitaltutor eV program: playfully program, build robots and experiment, design digitally and master fun challenges.
We encourage children to actively face challenges and solve tasks independently. In the Coding Club they learn to develop their own solution strategies for problems and experience themselves as capable and self-competent.
With this innovative educational offer, we focus on skills for the future and at the same time we instruct children to find a healthier use of digital media. For a future in which the minds of tomorrow dominate digitalization and not one in which digitalization dominates the children.
We help beginners by promoting motor skills in the use of digital tools. Little geniuses are challenged by abstraction and logic in programming (sequences, loops, events and conditions). Later, in the course of the Coding Club, when there is enough basic understanding of algorithms and informational thinking, we turn to a real programming language with the pupils, for example Python.
All participants are specially trained in dealing with digital devices and modern working methods, such as the use of video conferencing and e-collaboration. The Coding Club creates a space and identification to promote communication, social behavior and teamwork.
The students can use the learning platform of the Coding Club from anywhere and at any time to access their learning projects, even with devices from their own household.

Algorithms

We will design Algorithms: Algorithms are recipes or instructions. The quick start guide for baking is an algorithm to make a cake:

  1. Preheat oven
  2. Cream together sugar and butter
  3. Beat in eggs
  4. Add flour and baking powder
  5. Mix all well
  6. Stir in the milk until batter is smooth
  7. Pour batter into cupcakes
  8. Put cupcakes into preheated oven
  9. Bake

To learn more about the importance of Algorithms in our world, we encourage you to watch Kevin Slavin’s presentation at TEDGlobal on “How Algorithms Shape Our World”, where he argues that we’re living in a world designed for and increasingly controlled by — algorithms.

Abstraction: Modeling, Decomposing and generalisation

A key challenge that is addressed in computational thinking is the scale and complexity of a problem.  The main technique used to manage this complexity is abstraction.  Complexity is dealt with by hiding complicated details behind a simple abstraction, or model, of the situation.  For example, a map of a train system is a simple model of a complex reality — but it is a model that contains precisely the information necessary to plan a route from one station to another.

Programming

A computational thinker is not synonymous with a Computer Programmer but programming encourages creativity, logical thought, precision and problem-solving, and helps foster the personal, learning and thinking skills required in the modern school curriculum. Programming gives concrete, tangible form to the idea of “abstraction”, and repeatedly shows how useful it is in any discipline.

Computers

Students will learn the main components that make up a computer system, and how they fit together.
Students will learn what the internet is and the principles underlying how data is exchanged via the internet.

Data Structures

Data Structures are ways of storing “stuff”.  Just as we can put “stuff” in stacks, queues (piles), heaps and buckets – you can do the same thing with data (information). One common example of a data structure, in the real world, is the Pez Dispenser.  Pez uses ‘stacks’ to store and dispense candy. Without structure to all the “stuff” we can’t use it as information to solve other issues.

Project-based Learning

First comes the project, then we have a ‘goal’ that we need to achieve, ‘tasks’ that define the actions that lead to that goal, a ‘Time frame’ that includes starting and ending points, and ‘people’ that perform the tasks during the defined period of time, in order to achieve the goals. Project-based learning is not only highly motivating but also prepares the students for the adult work processes especially in development.

Explorative Learning

Data Structures are ways of storing “stuff”.  Just as we can put “stuff” in stacks, queues (piles), heaps and buckets – you can do the same thing with data (information). One common example of a data structure, in the real world, is the Pez Dispenser.  Pez uses ‘stacks’ to store and dispense candy. Without structure to all the “stuff” we can’t use it as information to solve other issues.

Game-based Learning

Data Structures are ways of storing “stuff”.  Just as we can put “stuff” in stacks, queues (piles), heaps and buckets – you can do the same thing with data (information). One common example of a data structure, in the real world, is the Pez Dispenser.  Pez uses ‘stacks’ to store and dispense candy. Without structure to all the “stuff” we can’t use it as information to solve other issues.

Gamification

Data Structures are ways of storing “stuff”.  Just as we can put “stuff” in stacks, queues (piles), heaps and buckets – you can do the same thing with data (information). One common example of a data structure, in the real world, is the Pez Dispenser.  Pez uses ‘stacks’ to store and dispense candy. Without structure to all the “stuff” we can’t use it as information to solve other issues.

Teamwork and Collaboration

In cooperation, students strengthen their skills and competences together. They learn to work together and take responsibility. By working as a group we can bring many ideas together and come up with something bigger than what a single student would do on her own.
Collaboration often clarifies and spurs students’ thinking. Peers are often better than the teacher in explaining things so kids “get” them. In collaboration team members help each other even with little details, because students are each good at a certain part.

Agile

Data Structures are ways of storing “stuff”.  Just as we can put “stuff” in stacks, queues (piles), heaps and buckets – you can do the same thing with data (information). One common example of a data structure, in the real world, is the Pez Dispenser.  Pez uses ‘stacks’ to store and dispense candy. Without structure to all the “stuff” we can’t use it as information to solve other issues.

Design Thinking and Cycle

Design thinking is a method – or rather a way of thinking – that comes from product development (software and design) and offers many innovative approaches to developing ideas and turning ideas into reality. The method is used to develop a solution for a problem and to approach the solution step by step and in a structured way. We playfully go through the design process from the idea to the solution.

Error Culture / no blame organisation

Data Structures are ways of storing “stuff”.  Just as we can put “stuff” in stacks, queues (piles), heaps and buckets – you can do the same thing with data (information). One common example of a data structure, in the real world, is the Pez Dispenser.  Pez uses ‘stacks’ to store and dispense candy. Without structure to all the “stuff” we can’t use it as information to solve other issues.

Continuous improvement

We don’t stagnate. We learn how to succeed and improve from one point to the other. From each and every task or story that we complete, there is something good to learn. We will learn how to do things better. Every mistake is a potential for a change for the better.

The best summary of skills and competencies fostered is provided by the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) of which standards we follow:

  • Empowered Learner
  • Digital Citizen
  • Knowledge Constructor
  • Innovative Designer
  • Computational Thinker
  • Creative Communicator
  • Global Collaborator

The Junior Coding Club’s playful activities incorporate logical and social skills, empower student voice and ensure that learning is a student-driven process. Our curricular is a best practise blend from sources of code.org, Hour-of-Code initiative, Wonder Workshop, Scratch, Hello Ruby, Minecraft Education, CS First and from modern teamwork principles like Design Thinking and Agile Project Management.

We also consider these international and German computer science (CS) teaching standards, such as: